Bioethics

Pushing the Limits on Embryo Research

It’s no surprise to many of us that the “14-day rule,” which limits research on human embryos to their first two weeks of development, is being challenged. For those of us who were around during the Bush presidency and the time of the great stem cell debates, we always knew the 14-day rule would erode. A […]

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May News From the CBC

The 2021 Paul Ramsey Institute Award Dinner honoring Helen Alvaré was an enormous success! It was so wonderful to see so many people, gathered safely, celebrating the work of Professor Alvaré and the Center for Bioethics and Culture. The night was one that we will surely remember for years to come. We want to thank […]

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With Artificial Wombs, Who Needs Women?

We buy genetic material from young men and women. We allow other women to carry our genetic children. We’ve eliminated the need for sex to create a child. Are we eliminating the need for a uterus, too? Are we trying to eradicate the need for women?  According to a new publication in Nature, scientists in […]

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Fertility Drugs and Cancer (Part 2)

Welcome to part two of my investigation concerning fertility drugs and cancer risk. In this article, I am going to examine a publication from 2017 titled “Use of fertility medications and cancer risk: A review and update”.  This publication, unlike the first, was a review of recent literature or research already in existence. It didn’t […]

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Human Experimentation Without Consent Is Basis of a Growth Industry

That we would allow humans to be experimented on without their knowledge or consent sounds like something out of the past. But in the world of assisted reproduction, more commonly called in vitro fertilization (IVF), it happens by the tens of thousands each day, all around the world, to human embryos. Allow me to explain. IVF is […]

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With Surrogate Mothers, US Citizenship Is for Sale

The international surrogacy market is fraught with problems, but one major problem that goes largely unnoticed is that U.S. citizenship is being bought and sold to international couples who hire U.S. surrogate mothers to carry their children to birth. Here is a short primer on how one becomes a U.S. citizen. First, most Americans have birthright citizenship, meaning anyone […]

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Man’s Final Conquest

I recently read, “The Future of Everything: The Cutting Edge of Health,” in The Wall Street Journal. I was a pediatric critical care nurse for many years, working in high-tech health care, where we were always pushing the technology envelope while trying to stay on the right side of the razor-thin line of ethics. Could […]

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Women As Guinea Pigs in Biotechnical Research

From remarks delivered at the Heritage Foundation’s recent panel, “Bioethics: What It Is and Why It Matters“ In 1985, just seven years after the birth of Louise Brown (1978), the world’s first ‘test tube’ baby, Gena Corea published her very important book titled, The Mother Machine: Reproductive Technologies from Artificial Insemination to Artificial Wombs. In […]

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A Populist Bioethics Commission?

Our friend Wesley Smith makes some provocative suggestions for President-Elect Trump to establish a “populist bioethics commission.” The issue is pressing because biomedical technology is way out ahead of our policies: We are entering Brave New World territory, with potentially momentous impact on culture and the concept of family. Human cloning has, with way too […]

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4th Year of Paul Ramsey Institute Begins This Week

Dear Friend, This week we begin our fourth year of our Paul Ramsey Institute as we welcome the second cohort of Ramsey Fellows to San Francisco for our Fall gathering. We’re pleased to announce that our new cohort includes students from the University of Chicago, Cornell Medical School, Claremont University, and New York University, to […]

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The Birds and the Bees and Children’s Literature

When my children were younger we spent a lot of time at our local public library. We went to the weekly story time and the annual fairs, joined the summer reading programs to win prizes for books read, and spent a lot of time sitting on rugs and tiny chairs reading, reading, and reading. It’s […]

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This Week in Bioethics

1. New Study Evidences that Egg Freezing “Doesn’t Always Work” A new study in JAMA Internal Medicine found a success rate of only 43% of live births for women who freeze their eggs. Fresh eggs yield a success rate that is only slightly higher at 50%. As the high failure rates evidence, the practice of egg […]

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This Week in Bioethics

1. Embryo Selection on the Rise It’s been a big week for embryo-selection technology. Earlier this week the St. Louis Post-Dispatch highlighted a new technology, EmbryoScope, that is both an incubator for embryos as well as a camera that takes photos of the embryos to monitor their development. As I mentioned earlier this week, 60 Minutes highlighted the […]

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This Week in Bioethics

One week ago today the United States Supreme Court legalized same-sex marriage in all fifty states. The push for “marriage equality” has now resulted in demands for “family equality.” In this special edition of This Week in Bioethics, we alert you to the top five things you need to know about the movement for “Family […]

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Should We Live Forever?

Later this week the FDA will meet with researchers to evaluate plans for a possible clinical trial that would use the drug metformin in hopes of delaying the onset of major diseases such as various cancers or heart disease. The drug is already used to treat type 2 diabetes, though researchers are optimistic that the […]

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Support for Physician Assisted Suicide Isn’t Liberalism, It’s Nihilism

There’s a fine new piece just out in POLITICO where Dr. Ira Byock calls out his fellow progressives for supporting physician assisted suicide under the guise of protecting civil liberties. He issues a strong indictment: Just when moral outrage and radical social change are called for, my fellow progressives have embraced physician-assisted suicide as their […]

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Good News, Bad News

I’m writing with good news and bad news. First, the good news: we have been surveying audiences who have watched Eggsploitation for several years now. The data show that overwhelmingly, before watching Eggsploitation, people are largely favorable to the practice although unfamiliar with the process of egg donation. But after watching Eggsploitation, people feel better […]

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Ball of Confusion or Ball of Disorder?

Reading about one hand Jason makes me think of the old 1970s Temptations song, “Ball of Confusion,” which was written about the state of the world during a difficult time of war, protest, and confusion. In an article titled, “Becoming disabled by choice, not chance: ‘Transabled’ people feel like impostors in their fully working bodies,” we […]

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