IVF

This Week in Bioethics

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1. New Records Set For Reproductive Technology in the United States According to a new report, the U.S. reproductive technology industry is slated to reach over $4 billion by 2020. The largest sector of the market, $1.2 billion, comes from fertility drug revenue. As we’ve long said, infertility has become a booming business in the […]

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IVF: Clarifications and Caveats

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Earlier this month I wrote about a recent study in the Journal of the American Medicine Association that found that “nearly two-thirds of women undergoing I.V.F. will have a child by the sixth attempt.” In commenting on the story I noted that the New York Times reported on the study with a rather deceiving headline: […]

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IVF Pays Off…For Whom?

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A new study published in the Journal of the American Medicine Association at the end of 2015 suggested that “nearly two-thirds of women undergoing I.V.F. will have a child by the sixth attempt.” The headline in the New York Times declared “With In Vitro Fertilization, Persistence Pays Off.” But as Pamela Tsigdinos suggests, the payoff […]

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This Week in Bioethics

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1. Assisted Suicide Law Now in Effect in Quebec Quebec’s assisted suicide law went into effect yesterday. According to the Minister of Justice, the law is aimed at “allowing people at the end of their lives to receive care that respects their dignity and their autonomy.” It’s both strange and tragic how suicide—normally condemned and […]

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Adventures in Fertility?

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Jason Gay, a sports columnist for the Wall Street Journal, had an essay in the weekend edition of the paper on a different sort of game for him: fertility medicine. In a casual and, at times, humorous essay, “Adventures in Fertility,” Mr. Gay discusses the woes of waiting until one’s mid-thirties to begin trying to […]

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This Week in Bioethics

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1. Australian High Court Rules BRCA1 Gene Cannot Be Patented The Australian High Court has issued a final ruling that the BRCA gene cannot be patented. Mutations of the BRCA1 gene often lead to higher risks of breast cancer and other cancers. This ruling overturns two lower level court rulings but follows similar rulings in […]

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The Parent Trap – Brave New World Style

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Growing up, I can’t even count the number of times I watched the Disney movie The Parent Trap (the original, with Hayley Mills). It’s a cute story about identical twins separated at birth because of their parents’ divorce. In dividing assets in the breakup, each parent took one of the girls. It’s only when the […]

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This Week in Bioethics

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1. Human Sperm Grown in Laboratory A French team announced earlier this week that they have grown sperm by culturing immature cells taken from the testes of infertile men. While many are optimistic that it could help young men who are rendered sterile from cancer treatments and adult men who cannot produce sperm, some also […]

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This Week in Bioethics

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1. California Physician Assisted Suicide Bill on Governor Brown’s Desk On the heels of last week’s decision by the California state legislature to pass physician assisted suicide, pressure is now on Governor Jerry Brown to veto the legislation. This week the American College of Physicians sent a letter to the governor encouraging him to do […]

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Fertility Treatments Give Birth to Depression

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A new study from the University of Copenhagen found that “women who give birth after receiving fertility treatment are five times more likely to develop depression compared to women who don’t give birth.” While the study does not attempt to answer why these women experience depression, it raises important questions worth considering and adds to the […]

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“Souls on Ice” and the Surrogate Women Who Would Be Their Mothers

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Through our documentary film work we have told the stories of women harmed from their decision to “donate” their eggs, we’ve interviewed young men and women who are speaking out about their being born of anonymous sperm donation, and we’ve told the stories of surrogate mothers who were treated like Breeders and bonded with the […]

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The Birds and the Bees and Children’s Literature

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When my children were younger we spent a lot of time at our local public library. We went to the weekly story time and the annual fairs, joined the summer reading programs to win prizes for books read, and spent a lot of time sitting on rugs and tiny chairs reading, reading, and reading. It’s […]

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This Week in Bioethics

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1. China Prohibits Egg Freezing, Encourages Sale of Sperm China has long held a ban on single women freezing their eggs, but now in light of the decision by Juhuasuan, a Chinese company affiliated with Alibaba (the Chinese equivalent to eBay) to begin selling sperm, some Chinese women are pushing back against “reproductive inequalities.” Here at […]

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U.S. Senate Bill Could Expand the Market for Third Party Reproduction

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On Wednesday, the U.S. Senate Committee on Veterans’ Affairs will consider S.B. 469, a bill intended “to improve the reproductive assistance provided by the Department of Defense and the Department of Veterans Affairs to severely wounded, ill, or injured members of the Armed Forces, veterans, and their spouses or partners, and for other purposes.” While […]

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Breeding Out Disease (Or Gender)

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Last night 60 Minutes aired an episode highlighting the rise of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD), where doctors screen an embryo to test for genetic mutations that may lead to eventual diseases. Advocates of this technology laud that fact that it could be used to test for and prevent muscular dystrophy, breast cancer, and even Alzheimer’s. […]

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Top Ten Posts (#5) #TBT

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We’re using #TBT (Throw Back Thursday) to count down the top ten all time most popular posts here at CBC-Network.org. This week’s entry, #5, is a warning and plea on egg donation. From “Thinking About Donating Your Eggs? Think Again” The egg donation process is inherently risky, from beginning to end. What are those risks? […]

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Father of The Pill, Always the Provocateur

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Carl Djerassi, at 91, is still making predictions about the future of sex, baby making, and abortion. In his usual fashion, he’s making waves. Known mostly for his work developing the oral contraceptive birth control pill in the early 1950s, he’s now predicting that abortions will become obsolete because people will opt for sterilization, making […]

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The “Ease” of Babies Outside the Womb

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“Making Babies Outside of the Womb Has Never Been So Easy” exclaims a new headline in The Atlantic. The article reports that one percent of children now born in the U.S. are conceived via reproductive technology in some form or fashion (IVF, sperm or egg donation, surrogacy, or a combination thereof). As the author notes: […]

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