30% Off our Third Party Reproduction Trilogy for a Limited Time

by Matthew Eppinette, CBC Executive Director on June 6, 2016

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To celebrate the grand opening of our new Facebook shop, we are offering a sale on our Third Party Reproduction DVD Trilogy: Breeders: A Subclass of Women?, Anonymous Father’s Day, and Eggsploitation. The trilogy is regularly $49.99, but for a limited time we are offering all three films on DVD for $34.99. You must place the order through our Facebook shop to get this price. This offer is only good for a limited time, so place your order ASAP!

About Breeders: A Subclass of Women?

Surrogacy is fast becoming one of the major issues of the 21st century—celebrities and everyday people are increasingly using surrogates to build their families. But the practice is fraught with complex implications for women, children, and families. What is the impact on the women who serve as surrogates and on the children who are born from surrogacy? In what ways might money complicate things? What about altruistic surrogacy done for a family member or close friend? Is surrogacy a beautiful, loving act or does it simply degrade pregnancy to a service and a baby to a product? Can we find a middle ground? Should we even look for one?

About Anonymous Father’s Day

Thousands of donor-conceived people have a deep longing to know who they belong to, where they come from, and who they look like. What is it like to grow up not knowing who your biological father is or if you have any siblings? What is it like to find out that the man you thought was your dad is not your biological father, that your true biological father donated his sperm and is known only by a number? How does it impact your self-perception, the choices you make, and your view of life and the world? Donor-conceived people are demanding answers to these basic questions about their origins, their lives, and their identities.

About Eggsploitation

The infertility industry in the United States has grown to a multi-billion dollar business. What is its main commodity? Human eggs. Young women all over the world are solicited by ads—via college campus bulletin boards, social media, online classifieds—offering up to $100,000 for their “donated” eggs, to “help make someone’s dream come true.” But who is this egg donor? Is she treated justly? What are the short- and long-term risks to her health? The answers to these questions will disturb you . . .


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