This Week in Bioethics

by Christopher White, CBC Director of Research and Education on March 11, 2016

Post image for This Week in Bioethics

1. Failed U.S. Uterus Transplant

Two days after being hailed a success, the U.S.’s first uterus transplant has failed and the organ was removed after complications. Uterine transplants, while offering the hope of giving birth to women born without a uterus, are not without serious risks. Some critics have used this to champion surrogacy as the safer, more reliable option, but both present risks of serious harms for the women and children involved. We believe that women and children deserve better than to settle for the least worst option available.

2. Assisted Suicide Law Set to Take Effect in CA

California will begin permitting assisted suicide this June, forever corrupting the practice of medicine in the state and drastically increasing the number of citizens in the U.S. that are vulnerable to such a law. It’s sure to be a grim day for the state and the nation.

3. Irish Looking Abroad for Surrogacy

Since 2011, surrogacy has been on the rise in Ireland with over 80 children born through the practice. Of that number, over 60 were born via international surrogacy in India. The recent passage of same-sex marriage in Ireland will doubtlessly expand the market for the practice.

4. CA Legislator Introduces Bill to Pay for Eggs for Research

A California state assembly leader has introduced new legislation that would compensate women to sell their eggs for research. Such attempts have been introduced in the past, but as Governor Jerry Brown reminded the state in 2013 when he vetoed the last bill, “not everything in life nor should it be.” This principle hasn’t changed—and neither should the state’s policy.

5. Adult Stem Cells Cure Blindness

Scientists at the University of California San Diego have been able to successfully use adult stem cells to cure cataracts. The new procedure uses stem cells to regrow a “living lens” in the eye of the patient and to reverse blindness. This is a major development worth celebrating—and one utilizing adult stem cells, which does not require the destruction of embryos. A true example of medical progress!

This Week in Bioethics Archive

Image by comopocococo via flickr (CC BY-SA 2.0)

Previous post:

Next post: