This Week in Bioethics

by Christopher White, CBC Director of Research and Education on October 2, 2015

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1. Adult Stem Cell Treatment Effective Against MS

Science Alert reported earlier this week that blood stem cells are proving effective in treating multiple sclerosis patients. This is a very promising development as it once more proves that adult stem cells can be successfully used for healing and treatment—eliminating the need for embryonic stem cells. In our documentary film Lines that Divide we profiled the work of Dr. Richard Burton and his success using adult stem cell treatment for MS patients. We’re glad to see this trend continuing. The next time you hear someone say that embryonic stem cells are necessary for treatments, be sure to remind that it simply isn’t true.

2. Woman Imprisoned for Massive Egg Donor Fraud

On Monday, a thirty-eight year old woman was sentenced to 18 months in prison for defrauding potential parents, egg donors, and surrogates in a massive egg donation scheme. Over the course of five years she swindled almost $300,000 out of these individuals and couples. Some may see this case and make calls for greater industry regulation. We can’t help but seeing this as proof positive that the entire industry is flawed and relies on the exploitation of some women for the gain of others. Close it all down!

3. New Study Predicts Global Growth of Sperm Bank Market

A new study out of the United Kingdom predicts that there will be significant growth in the global sperm donor market over the next seven years. The study noted that this is largely due the increased acceptance of same-sex marriage. As we’ve warned in recent months, there is a shift taking place where the push for “marriage equality” has now become one for “family equality” with advocates demanding that everyone has a right to a child. Welcome to the Brave New World where future generations are created only for the sake of satisfying one’s own personal desires and dreams.

4. UK Doctors to Begin Clinical Trials for Womb Transplants

A regulatory body in the United Kingdom has granted approval for doctors to perform ten womb transplants in 2016. The majority of these women have lost their uterus due to cancer treatments or preventative measures. In commenting on this news, Dr. Richard Smith observed that “Surrogacy is an option, but it does not answer the deep desire that women have to carry their own baby. For a woman to carry her own baby – that has to be a wonderful thing.” It’s amusing that while surrogacy advocates are quick to praise it as a miraculous good, they too are forced to recognize its failings and that it doesn’t really satisfy the desires of those who utilize it.

5. Surrogate Born Children in Limbo in Nepal

Five surrogate born children in Nepal are unable to be taken out of the country with their foreign intended parents. Nepal recently banned surrogacy, which has created a complicated legal process for children born of the practice. Once more we see how the industry harms those created by the process. When will it end?

This Week in Bioethics Archive

Image by Kurtis Gabutt via flickr (CC BY-SA 2.0)

 

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